How To Disassemble a Trampoline in 7 Easy Steps


If you have a trampoline, you’re going to have to disassemble it at some point (or pay someone else to do it). You may want to take the trampoline down for the winter to ensure it lasts for many years. Or perhaps you’re moving homes and disassembly is the best way to transport the equipment to the new house. It doesn’t really matter why you need to take it apart, only that it’s done in the best manner possible. If you read on, I’ll tell you all about how to disassemble a trampoline in 7 easy steps. 

Before we get to the steps themselves, let’s take a look at some common trampoline disassembly questions. 

Note: This guide deals with trampolines that have springs. If you have a spring-free trampoline, this may not be as useful to you, although some of the steps will be similar

How Long Does it Take to Disassemble a Trampoline?

The time it takes to dismantle a trampoline varies depending on the trampoline type, size, and whether you have the proper tools for the job. You should expect to spend anywhere between two and four hours disassembling your trampoline. 

That said, I’ll give you some hacks below that can cut down on the disassembly time significantly. If you can get another adult to help you, you’ll definitely cut down on the disassembly time. 

How Difficult is it to Disassemble a Trampoline?

Taking a trampoline apart isn’t all that difficult, although taking the springs off requires some strength. It’s generally easier than assembling the trampoline. You really only need one person to take a trampoline apart, or two if you want the extra help. 

Once you know what to do, it’s pretty easy. You don’t need any technical knowledge and you don’t need to be “handy” to do it. It’s just a matter of taking the time to get it done. 

What Tools Do You Need to Take Apart a Trampoline?

You will need some specific tools to take apart a trampoline. Without these tools, the job will become much more difficult, if not impossible. So it’s best to gather these tools before you start the job. 

  • Spring Tool
    • This should have come with your trampoline. It’s usually a simple T-shaped tool with a handle (about 4-inches long) and a metal bar (about 5-inches long) with a dull hook at the end. If you don’t have one of these handy, you can purchase one here. You don’t really need one (I’ll show you a little hack later), but it does make things easier at the start. 
  • Electric Drill With Phillips Bit
    • Using a regular screwdriver will take forever and will leave you with sore forearms and hands. A drill with the appropriate sized Phillips bit is essential for taking a trampoline apart.
  • 10mm Wrench or Socket Wrench
    • Depending on the hardware on your trampoline, you may need a wrench set. Most trampolines require a 10mm wrench (also called a spanner in other parts of the world). If you have a socket wrench, disassembly will be much easier.
  • Optional: Work Gloves
    • If you have rusty components, such as springs, screws, or frame parts, you’ll want to wear protective gloves. These are not required, but they’ll protect your hands as you work.  
  • Other Supplies
    • Plastic closable bags and a marker to label them.
    • Original boxes that the trampoline came in (or comparably sized boxes).

How to Disassemble a Trampoline in 7 Easy Steps

YouTube video

Now let’s dive into how to dismantle a trampoline!

1. Take Down the Enclosure Poles

Different trampolines have these enclosure poles attached in different ways. Luckily, it’s easy to determine how yours are attached by looking at the frame underneath the springs. Often, these safety poles — which hold up the safety net — are fastened with a screw and a bolt. Unscrew the fasteners, remove them, and place them in a plastic bag labeled to tell you where they came from. 

Place the safety poles down on the trampoline mat as you work your way around. 

2. Remove the Safety Pad

Once you have all the poles down on the mat, you’ll be able to remove the safety pad over the springs and the outer frame. To do this, you’ll want to untie or unhook the fasteners keeping the pad in place. Once that’s done, you can remove the pad, fold it up, and set it aside. 

3. Remove the Enclosure Poles from the Safety Net

Next, remove the poles from the net, setting them aside as you do this. There are many net styles out there, with varying attachment options. It should be easy to look at where the net and the pole are attached and determine what you need to do to separate them. Often, this is a 10mm bolt and/or a Phillips screw. Sometimes it’s a simple strap with a clip. 

Once all the enclosure poles are removed and set aside (and any hardware either re-attached to the pole or put in a labeled bag), you can advance to the next step. 

4. Remove the Net

If you have a net that can be removed without first removing the springs, do so now. These types of safety nets are often clipped or strapped to the triangle rings, and you can remove them by getting underneath the trampoline and detaching them. 

Once you’ve detached the net from the trampoline, fold the net up and set it aside. 

5. Remove the Springs

Next, you’ll want to remove the springs. This is where the spring tool comes into play. Using the tool, you can pull on the spring hook that’s attached to the frame, pulling the hook out of the hole and letting it hang off the triangle ring on the trampoline mat. 

You don’t need to do this in any particular order. You can simply work your way all around, or you can leave every couple of springs attached if you don’t want the mat getting dirty as it comes into contact with the ground. 

You can either remove the springs as you go, placing them in a box as you work, or you can leave them hanging and remove them in batches. 

Hack: How Do You Get a Spring Off a Trampoline Without the Tool?

If you don’t have a spring tool, you can still easily get the springs off. In fact, this way may be even easier than using the tool. You just need to remove one spring (or use an extra one you have). Use that spring as the tool, inserting one of the spring’s hooks into the still-attached spring’s hook where it meets the frame. Pull it out and remove the hook from the hole in the frame. Just watch your fingers, as the springs can pinch sometimes! This is where gloves help. 

YouTube video

Related Article: 7 Trampoline Spring Tool Alternatives (In Case You Lost Yours!)

6. Fold the Mat

Once you have all the springs removed and boxed up, it’s time to fold the mat. Fold it in half, matching up the rounded sides. Then fold the matched rounded sides toward the straight side, folding it in half again. From here, you can fold it as many times as you like to get it into a manageable bundle. Set it aside. 

7. Disassemble the Frame

Now you’re only down to the frame! If there are any screws holding the top of the frame to the legs, remove those and place them in a labeled bag. If there are no screws or bolts, you can simply pull apart the metal components, removing them and sorting them as you work your way around. Place legs together and the top of the frame together so you know which is which for reassembly. 

That’s it! Now all you have to do is store the pieces for the winter or pack them up and move them to your new home.  

In Conclusion

Taking apart a trampoline can be a bit of a hassle, but it’s nowhere near as difficult as many people expect it to be. As long as you do things in the logical order outlined above, you will be able to dismantle the trampoline in a timely and efficient manner. 

Most of the stuff is pretty easy to do until you come to spring removal, but even that is easy when you use the tool or another spring to get the job done. It’s really just a matter of getting it done, which doesn’t take more than a couple of hours. 

I hope this article helps you take your trampoline apart. Thanks for reading!

Justin

Justin Childress is the creator of Sunshineandplay.com. He is also a devoted husband and father of his 1 year old son Gabriel. Justin enjoys spending time with family, reading, and, of course, contributing to Sunshineandplay.com.

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